“Interpersonal interaction,” “communication,” and "social involvement" constitute D.W. and D. Sue’s definition of “counseling”   (2003). Since “definitions” (any construct’s “what-ness”) are   insufficient to precisely convey any person's, place's, or thing’s “becoming-ness,” the “I like…game” counseling technique provides a  flexibly structured, individual or small-group counseling format,  which insures an honestly authentic dialogue between and among two  to approximately fifteen participants. The “I like…game’s”  effectiveness is derived, or sentence-stems, from the shared  etymological roots of the Spanish verb “gustar,” meaning “to like,”  and the English noun “gusto,” defined in Webster’s as: 1)   “individual or special taste,” 2) “enthusiastic and vigorous enjoyment or appreciation,” and, 3) “vitality marked by an abundance  of vigor and enthusiasm.” Client-participants in the “I like…game”  are impelled by the rules of the game to both positive choosing and  cooperative/respectful waiting, following a therapeutically flexible  script, toward increased insight and experiential counseling/parenting skill.